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Countdown to the general election - Who’s making the headlines?

February 23rd, 2015 - Posted by Doireann Clabby in Political Media Tracker

According to our analysis of party leader coverage in the national press between 10th and 21st February, Ed Miliband's share of voice jumped sharply to outperform Cameron, and the other party heads, for much of the period. The Labour leader felt the love of UK media coverage over the Valentine weekend – his name appearing in almost twice as many national press articles as his Conservative rival, David Cameron.

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Miliband's defence of controversial comedian Russell Brand gained him some derisory press mentions, as did his 'pledge' to get popular entertainment duo Ant and Dec back onside.

On the significant issues, the lion's share of Miliband mentions came from his row with David Cameron over allegations of tax avoidance by high profile Conservative donors, as well as his announcement to create some 80,000 new apprenticeships as part of a wider productivity plan for England.

But by the end of our analysis period Ed Miliband's media profile had fallen dramatically - almost to the level of UKIP's Nigel Farage, the Green's Natalie Bennett and Liberal Democrat leader, Nick Clegg: all of whom had a very quiet February.

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